Home > Democratic Elections, Government, Taxation > Ballot Initiatives and Michigan Roads

Ballot Initiatives and Michigan Roads

Michigan voters will soon be asked to vote on a sales tax increase and other measures partly designed to raise additional revenue for the repair of state roads which are widely regarded to be in poor condition. These initiatives seem to me to be a sign of government incompetence or an inability of government to function to serve the interests of the voters.  In California, a state where these ballot proposals have often occurred, the traditional explanation is that the legislature is unable to function because it is so polarized and, as a result, the voters must step in to get things accomplished that ought to be done by the state government. But there is another aspect of the Michigan ballot which is troubling.

“Logrolling” is a word used to describe a practice in government of attaching laws with weak support to a bill containing other policies with strong support. The idea is to get a weak law passed which would not pass on its own. This seems to happen regularly at the federal level. And so one additional aspect of the Michigan ballot measure will contain an expansion of tax subsidies using the Earned Income tax credit which I suspect is a feature of the state tax code that would not garner widespread support.

I intend to vote against the Michigan ballot proposal despite the fact that I, like most voters, agree that state roads are poorly maintained. My reasons are as follows.

  1. I regard road maintenance as a responsibility of government. If the Legislature can’t meet this basic responsibility, why do I need them?
  2. Voters cannot be well-informed about budget matters compared to politicians. We solve an agency problem when we vote, electing agents (politicians) to represent the interests of the principals (the voters) in the state. Policymaking done by voters can’t possibly be better-informed than when policies are implemented by the managers that we elect. I simply don’t have the time to do the job of politicians that we elect. Poor policies are more likely to occur when ballot initiatives are used.
  3. A sales tax is a poor way to fund roads. User fees are the proper way to do this and so taxes on gasoline are a better way to fund road maintenance.
  4. I am suspicious of the logrolling that is in the ballot proposal. I find it most interesting that there seems to be little discussion of the proposal outside of the road maintenance aspect of it.
  5. Finally a message needs to be sent to the Legislature. Do your job. Or perhaps we need a new set of politicians serving the interests of the voters.

So far, polls show that the ballot proposal is not supported by the majority of taxpayers in the state. I hope this is still true when the vote is actually done. This ballot proposal s a monument to the low quality of government in Michigan.

Advertisements
  1. Steve
    November 2, 2015 at 4:41 PM

    It would be interesting to know the extent to which the low quality of persons in the Michigan legislature is attributable to term limits.

    • November 3, 2015 at 2:37 PM

      I have spoken to individuals who spend time lobbying in the Legislature and they have uniformly said that term limits are a disaster. In their opinion, there are far too many legislators who are clueless about how things work.

  1. No trackbacks yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Economics One

A blog by John B. Taylor

The Grumpy Economist

One economist's views on economic policy.

The WordPress.com Blog

The latest news on WordPress.com and the WordPress community.

%d bloggers like this: